And the winner is…

Congratulations to Rana whose comment about her cactus named Cesare made me laugh! Drop me over an email or a message with your postal address and I’ll pop your book in the post!

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The History of the Medici family – Medieval Courses


Some of you may have noticed me going on and on and on over on social media for the past however many months about my ‘Medici project’. Well, it’s finally here! In conjunction with the wonderful guys over on MedievalCourses, I’ve just launched my latest course on the history of that fascinating Florentine family. Head on over now to sign up for the 5.5hr course covering over THREE CENTURIES of history!

I’m so so excited for this course and even more excited for you guys to enjoy it and, more importantly, learn loads and loads of cool stuff.

Find the course (MC11) here.

You can also find my course on the history of the Borgia family here.

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A Cesare Borgia GIVEAWAY

On 12 March 1507, Cesare Borgia was killed just outside Viana in Navarre. So to commemorate his passing, I’m giving away one signed copy of my book, “Cesare Borgia in a Nutshell”


To be in with a chance of winning, subscribe (or be subscribed already) to my blog using the ‘follow’ button at the bottom of the page (shown below with the really faint red arrow)


Then leave a comment below with just why you’d like a copy of the book.

I’ll also send you a bunch of ‘Cesare Borgia In A Nutshell’ bookmarks!

You’ve got until Friday 23rd March! Go go go!

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[Review] The Flames of Florence by Donna Russo Morin


Il Magnifico, Lorenzo de’ Medici, is dead, and his now-exiled son, Piero, has brought ruin upon Florence. War and famine have tarnished and dulled the glittering city. Yet, the glory that is Renaissance artistry grows more magnificent, as does the work of the women known as Da Vinci’s Disciples. Now, they face their most dangerous challenge thus far, one shrouded in the cloak of a monk.

From the ashes of war, Friar Girolamo Savonarola rises. Some call him a savior and a prophet, a man willing to overthrow tyrannical rulers and corrupt clergy, the Borgia Pope among them. Fra Girolamo is determined to remold Florence from an avaricious, secular culture to a paragon of Christian virtues.

Many call Savonarola a delusional heretic, incapable of anything but self-serving fanaticism. When he sets out to destroy all secular art forms―literature, sculpture, paintings―Da Vinci’s Disciples call him an enemy…most, but not all of them.

Savonarola divides the people of Florence; neighbor turns on neighbor. Within the Disciples―within their families―fissures slash them when Viviana devises a dangerous plan to save whatever they can of the city’s art from Savonarola’s bonfires.

Who will reign triumphant? Will their families―their loves, friendships, and their art―survive the treacherous threat? Will the Disciples themselves―and all they’ve fought for and achieved―burn…in THE FLAMES OF FLORENCE?

I was lucky enough to get a copy of this book through NetGalley and the moment I received the email saying I could review it, I was SUPER excited. I’d actually found this book by accident, idly perusing the historical fiction section on the NetGalley website – normally I stick to their nonfiction but the moment I saw this one, and read the blurb, I knew I HAD to read it. And why? Historical fiction on Savonarola is rare – I’ve only read a couple of fiction books about him or including him and it’s gotten to the point where I really want to write a novel about him myself. I may even have the first chapter of such a tale tucked away somewhere on my computer…

But anyway, I digress. This book is the third in Morin’s ‘Da Vinci’s Disciples’ trilogy but I’d like to stress – you do not need to have read the other two to understand this one. It happily stands on its own as a tale of love, betrayal and heresy in Renaissance Florence. For the years that Savonarola ruled Florence were a torrid time which split the populace right down the middle with those who supported the friar and those who didn’t. In this novel we see just how much that split can affect a group of people who truly believe themselves to be family. For that is what the Disciples are – a family of women who paint, having been tutored under the great Leonardo da Vinci. I don’t want to give too much away about this plot point but let me tell you – you see how the split affects these women and you can truly feel the betrayal when it all comes to light.

I was particularly impressed with Morin’s characterisation of Savonarola. Having spent so long researching the man myself, you could really tell when reading this novel that she had done the same. And she has done the fascinating character of Girolamo Savonarola a justice that I have never seen another writer do before. Not only has she put the research in with Savonarola and his followers (I loved how she put in the friar firing the arquebus during the Siege of San Marco – a true story!) but she’s put the research in for the Florence that he occupied, mixing historical fact with exceptionally well written fiction involving a sect of female artists.

This book is truly excellent and one that I would highly recommend for anyone interested in Renaissance Florence. It’s an absolutely stunning read – Morin deserves high praise for creating such a masterpiece, weaving the real life character who existed in with those she has created. And she’s done it excellently. I’ll certainly be reading her previous two books in this trilogy at some point VERY soon.

The Flames of Florence, book 3 in the Da Vinci’s Disciples trilogy is released on 24 May 2018 in the UK, and available for pre-order now.

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Rome – Day 3

Our final day in Rome and we saved the best until last. Our original plan had been to visit the Vatican museums on the first day however that plan had soon be quashed when we’d seen the length of the queues thanks to us not pre-booking tickets. So, having pre-booked we took ourselves off on the little walk from our hotel to the Vatican and managed to skip the lines before the official opening times stated on the website.

Let me tell you – those halls were empty. And it was utterly glorious as we made our way as quickly as we possibly could to the part of the Apostolic Palace that had been one of the main reasons for our visit to Rome.

The Borgia apartments.


Early morning in the Vatican’s Hall of the Maps. It felt like we had the place to ourselves. A very blurry photo by me.


The disputation of St. Catherine. Photo by me.


Borgia coat of arms above a fireplace. Photo by me.


Pope Alexander VI kneeling. Photo by me.


The name Borgia carved into a fireplace. Photo by me.

The moment that we stepped foot inside the Borgia apartments and my eyes fell upon the Disputation of St. Catherine, particularly the figure of Lucrezia Borgia, my eyes welled up with tears. It was an incredibly special moment walking into that set of rooms and being completely and utterly alone. In a way it was almost as if, when you closed your eyes, you could imagine the family within the rooms as they spoke amongst themselves in the Valencian dialect. It took me a while to compose myself, let me tell you.

These apartments were build following Pope Alexander VI’s election in 1492 for his personal use and the frescoes that adorn the walls were completed by the Umbrian artist Pinturicchio in around 1493. The Hall of the Saints holds the most famous of the frescoes – the Disputation of St Catherine, which shows the members of Alexander’s family, whilst other rooms such as the Hall of the Mysteries of the Faith include the Adoration of the Magi and the Resurrection (in which Pope Alexander can be seen kneeling before the Risen Christ).

Below is a video I took whilst within the apartments, and whilst the place was still so incredibly quiet.

We spent a good hour sat in the apartments just drinking the whole thing in. Literally everywhere you look whilst in there you can see the Spanish influence – from the tiles on the floor to the pomegranates carved on the ceiling. It’s almost like you’ve walked into a Muslim influenced palace, such as the alhambra, and it is truly breathtaking. The second you walk through the door you know you are in the room of a Spanish family, and you know that these rooms are all about showing just how powerful the Borgia family were.

Of course, once we were done drinking in the solitude of the Borgia rooms we had an entire museum to look around. And we spent probably eight or nine hours wandering the corridors of the Vatican museums. Below are a selection of my favourite photographs from our visit.


Photo by me


View of St. Peter’s. Photo by me.


This acorn was originally at the front of old St. Peter’s. Photo by me.


Photo by me


Anubis. Photo by me.


Laocoon and His Sons. Photo by me


Photo by me


Photo by me


Photo by me


Photo by me


Photo by me


Photo by me


Medici crest. Photo by me.


Jesus bursting out of his tomb – gallery of tapestries. Photo by me.


Ceiling of the Gallery of Maps. Photo by me.


Gallery of maps. Photo by me.


Gallery of maps. Photo by me.


Borgia coat of arms. Photo by me


Mini Cesare chilling on a game board in the Borgia apartments. Photo by me

We spent hours and hours walking around the museum, happily getting lost in various galleries and gazing at treasures from so long ago. The amount of history they have in those halls is honestly just mind-blowing and, despite spending so long there, I honestly think we missed parts.

It just gives us an excuse to go back though, right?

After leaving the Vatican museums – and me spending far too much time in the gift shop – we headed for St. Peter’s Basilica…

And then we saw the queue…


The queue just kept going….and going…

So we decided to do something else. I’d seen signs dotted about for a Raphael Exhibition at the Palazzo Farnesina so we decided to hunt it down. We walked…and walked…and walked some more…only to find out that the place had closed earlier on in the afternoon. Back to the hotel it was, one last casual stroll back through the streets of Rome, so we could rest up before heading out for another fantastic meal.

The three full days we spent in Rome were honestly crammed full of activities – each day we walked well over ten miles but it was well and truly worth it. Every ache at the end of the day was worth it. We had an absolutely phenomenal time and although we saw loads, there’s still SO much more left to see. So there will be another trip to Rome on the cards at some point in the (I hope) not too distant future.

One thing’s for sure, though – this trip has given me so much inspiration for my next book! Let the writing commence!





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